Tuesday, 25 August 2015

Colt 45


Check out my new review of cool French cop thriller Colt 45 over at Blueprint Review.

Thursday, 20 August 2015

Lost Platoon



LOST PLATOON (1991)

Directed by: David A. Prior
Screenplay: David A. Prior & Ted Prior
Starring: William Knight, David Parry, Stephen Quadros, Michael Wayne

During his illustrious career, David A. Prior churned out a few gems in amongst all the cheapness, absurdity and gun blazing action and this nobody reviewer considers Lost Platoon to be one of those gems. For sure it’s cheap, absurd (to the Nth degree!) and is packed with gun blazing action but it’s a neat little film with a cool concept, meshing action and horror, for some fun low budget good times.

A reporter (Knight) is saved by a mysterious squad of fighters while in combat during his service as a frontline soldier. Said squad swoop in and decimate the advancing German army during a battle in WW2. Fast forward many years later and said reporter is still covering the war, this time in war torn Nicaragua, where an evil warlord is making a right nuisance of himself.  While covering the conflict, the reporter stumbles across said squad of fighters again, who have not aged, and finally discovers their secret to eternal life and super strength: they’re vampires. Said squad, having fought through the ages, swan in to help the cause in the Nicaragua but soon realise they are up against a greater foe as the evil warlord shares their taste for blood.


Cheap, campy and oh so silly, Lost Platoon isn’t quite as cool in its execution as the above synopsis suggests but Prior (co-writing with his brother Ted) get points for trying here, squeezes out a bit of creativity despite the lack of budget and, of course, crams the flick with bullet spewing action. The concept is cool: a squad of soldiers (led by Stephen “The Fight Professor” Quadros: cool!) from wars throughout the ages and turned to vampires, form a squad of super soldiers and help fight in major battles across time. This leads to much fighting, shooting, and groovy Evil Dead style POV-speeded up camerawork that is pretty much ripped off wholesale from said franchise. The story of the evil warlord is all by-the-by really and is just an excuse for lots of dudes running around with M16s, shooting each other in bloody squib-tastic fashion: so business as usual for Prior then. 


Shot in and around the woods of Alabama, Lost Platoon suffers from the usual sluggish pacing problems and often-amateur acting found in such cheap films, but Prior buoys proceedings with the odd bit of creativity and moments of what-the-fuck! From the groovy aforementioned camerawork to crazy moments such as the squad being able to catch bullets (!) and exhibit a Jedi mind trick when the situation calls for it (which is as hilarious as it sounds!) to the opening battle set during WW2, which is actually pretty cool and nicely staged.

If you ain’t one for Prior flicks then you’ll probably find the whole thing hilarious in a so bad its good way but if you dig his films and have an affinity for low budget action and horror flicks, especially ones that are kind of like a 50s B-movie with 80s style violent action, then Lost Platoon is a hoot and one of the sadly missed filmmaker’s more enjoyable escapades.

Trailer: 


Operation Warzone



OPERATION WARZONE (1988)

Directed by: David A. Prior
Screenplay: David A. Prior & Ted Prior
Starring: William Zipp, Fritz Matthews & Joe Spinell

Ah the good old days of B-movie action films where all you needed was a bunch of dudes, some prop guns, loads of squibs and a jungle/forest setting to film it all in and voila you have a movie. Ah the good old days of the David A. Prior films when he did exactly this. Operation Warzone is prime Prior: Vietnam jungle setting, squibs galore, M16 blazing action and a bunch of dudes running around getting shot.

Here three US army troops come under heavy fire, escape the Vietcong by hiding away in their tunnels, where they rescue a couple of other US army dudes who turn out to be undercover agents looking for somebody called “The General” who has information on some other army big-wig who is out to do a shady arms deal to make a ton of money. Or something. Throw in Joe (Maniac) Spinnell as the one orchestrating it all from his cushy office in DC and a ton of bloody squib, gun blasting action and voila, Operation Warzone.


If you love 80s Vietnam machine gun firing flicks, David A. Prior films and B-movies in general then you know the drill: scene after scene of machine gun spewing firepower, lots of running around, lots of shouting (and sweating!) and if all else fails/grinds to a holt/runs out of steam, a couple more machine gun spewing scenes of firepower. That’s Operation Warzone in a nutshell and if you dig all that has just been mentioned then this flick is some gun blasting good times. There is a lot of shouting from the cast (including one random Australian dude: “Enough of this dingo shit!”) lots of running around, double crosses, fist-fights (including one where it seems they ran out of ideas and so decided to just have two of the main characters punch one another!) and, yep, bloody squib gunplay galore. If Operation Warzone gets points for anything, it is for the amount of people shot in over-the-top squib-tastic fashion: so much so that even after one of the characters at the end of the film declares “It’s all over!” two more people get shot in a hail of bloody squibs! Awesome.

For it’s barely 80 minutes of runtime, Operation Warzone is an action blast but can’t escape Prior’s penchant for the absurd. Joe Spinell serves little purpose, only has a couple of scenes and is really only there to add a “name” to the cast: though he does get to look at an attractive ladies boobs in one of his scenes! The music is also all over the place: one minute 80s rock-tastic, propelling the action, the next minute going for comedy japes as the soldier’s run around looking lost. Weird! But thankfully we are never far away from the next machine-gunning action scene with bloody squibs going off! Not quite as dementedly fun as Prior’s Deadly Prey or Lost Platoon but still a bullet riddled action hoot from the late, great director. 

Tuesday, 18 August 2015

Vice


VICE (2015)

Directed by: Brian A. Miller
Screenplay: Jeremy Passmore & Andre Fabrizio
Starring: Thomas Jane, Ambyr Childers & Bruce Willis

Action sci-fi shenanigans abound in this slick if rather ho-hum thriller which sees a rather creepy guy called Julian (Willis, seemingly phoning in his performance from the future!) ruling over a fantasy section of society, called Vice, where humans can do whatever they want without consequences: basically for men to be complete dicks and kill people! Said section is inhabited by life like robots who aid scuzzy humans in living out their fantasies/depravity and when one of the said robots, Kelly (Childers), suddenly becomes self aware and realizes all the horrible things she has had to endure, decides to go on the run throwing the perfectly constructed world of Vice into chaos. After a bit of contrivance she teams up with long-haired no-nonsense cop Roy (Jane) who hates Vice and everything it stands for and the two go on the run, ever perused by Julian’s goons, in an attempt to expose Vice for the seedy and corrupt society it really is.


At a brisk 90 minutes, Vice moves along fast, has just enough gun blazing action to keep one entertained, a few good performances (sans Willis!) but unfortunately doesn’t spend enough time exploring it’s futuristic concept and setting. Kelly becomes self aware rather quickly and takes to it a little too easily so the on-the-run/chase element can kick in quicker. It’s running and chasing and shooting from there on out, which is all good and entertaining but Vice then just becomes a sort of run-of-the-mill chase thriller with a few sci-fi trappings. There is a sort of sub-plot of Kelly meeting/teaming up with a one of the originators of Vice who may be linked to her past, and he joins in with the run and shoot escapades, but unfortunately adds little interest and it would have been better if proceedings had just focused on the runaway robot and Thomas Jane’s grouchy, scruffy cop. 


Both Ambyr Childers and Thomas Jane (who always brings a bit of grit and class to genre fare), seem to be trying and give solid performances: though would appear to be in a different, and much better, film than everyone else. The less said about Bruce Willis’ lack of performance the better (extended cameo, seems asleep most of the time, picks up pay cheque!) and while some of the supporting cast are good (Johnathon Schaech coming across particularly creepy as Julian’s right hand man) they don’t get much to do in the film’s too short running time.

On the upside, the makers have certainly tried their best to deliver an entertaining package with a lower budget and a truncated run-time. Proceedings are pretty slick and some of the gun-toting action staging is well done and injects the film with some excitement. Plot absurdities abound but Childers central performance and just enough bullet spewing action keep Vice on an entertaining track, especially those looking for a small dose of entertaining sci-fi action trash. 


Friday, 14 August 2015

Marked Man


MARKED MAN (1996)

Directed by: Mark. F. Voizard
Screenplay: Thomas Ritz
Starring: Roddy Piper, Jane Wheeler & Miles O’Keeffe

Rowdy Rod takes centre stage in this low budget riff on The Fugitive and while he gets to punch many (many) folks in the face, he reigns it in somewhat to portray a wrongfully accused man attempting to clear his name. Sent to the clink for accidentally killing (i.e. punching the man to death!) a douchebag drunk driver who kills his fiancĂ©, former mechanic Frank Gibson pays his dues and wiles away his time showing off his fight skills in some prison sparring. Unfortunately, he stumbles onto the hit of another inmate, the two corrupt guards perpetrating the killing then setting their sights on Frank. He does a runner, escapes death, but is now on the run with cops, mob enforcers and shady ex-cop/hitman Miles O’Keeffe hot on his trail.


Run of the mill video filler (from the once prolific Pierre David 90s action movie production line: Mission of Justice, Martial Outlaw, Bounty Tracker and many more) which is livened up by the presence of Piper, O’Keeffe making for a decent bad guy and that the pace never slackens meaning it has a cool on-the-run vibe. Roddy Piper always makes for a good action hero from classics like They Live to action blow-outs such as Back in Action and Tough and Deadly. While he had a somewhat jokey persona in those films, here he plays it straight as a man under pressure and on the run. He’s pretty good too, bringing a of bit class to proceedings as the wrongfully accused Gibson but don’t worry he still gets to punch, kick and break a lot of necks. Good to see O’Keeffe (The Hard Way, Phantom Raiders) here also as he makes for a suitably shifty bad guy, despite his very dated mid-nineties ponytail (not cool!).

It’s all very predictable, low-rent and in some instances a little absurd (Piper foiling the robbery of a coffee shop he is hiding out in, just so he can punch yet another person in the film: though the douche holding up the coffee shop certainly deserved it!), yet it all trundles along rapidly, is nicely shot on location (in Canada!) and features a good smattering of nicely staged rough and tough action. Piper and O’Keeffe have a brutal one-on-one and there is a nicely choreographed fight between Piper and another goon in the finale. They Live is still Piper’s best and this doesn’t quite touch the action awesomeness of Back in Action and Tough and Deadly but Marked Man is a very enjoyable B-movie with a solid performance from the late and great Rowdy Roddy Piper. 

Trailer: